Blog

What’s Next for Your Career?

Membership is an Opportunity to Advance, Earn More

What does membership in a professional association like the Alliance of Cardiovascular Professionals offer you? Short answer: a higher salary, more opportunities for advancement, and more chances for you to be recognized for your work and seen as a professional who advances the field of cardiovascular care.

Association membership and compensation are connected. A 2008 Smith Bucklin report analyzed salary data across the United States and found, when controlling for other demographic and job category variables, that association members earned on average $10,000 more than their non-member colleagues.

What’s next for your career? How do you reach the next rung of the career ladder? How might you overcome the physical and emotional exhaustion of your hard work and find personal and professional fulfillment above and beyond the day-to-day?

Maybe it’s unclear how you can demonstrate your commitment and worth, beyond simply showing up and doing a great job every day. Or maybe it seems like you’ve achieved the highest level of recognition or compensation for your profession, and there’s no more space to grow. Maybe you want to make a greater, direct impact on the quality of care in your community by advancing into management, but are unclear where to start on that path.

No matter what you’re trying to accomplish in your life, personally and professionally, every big achievement starts with a first step. If we want to be sure of achieving our goals, we should make sure our first steps provide us with the support we need to finish the journey.

As the only professional association catering specifically to non-physician professionals in cardiovascular care, ACVP is the best resource to help you achieve your goals. Membership in ACVP is a first step towards advancing your profession and your career.

Keep reading to learn more about how ACVP membership can support you, or take your first steps now by joining ACVP and accessing our many supportive benefits and services.

Join ACVP, now »


Continue reading What’s Next for Your Career?

Should CT Coronary Angiography be a First-Order Test?

New guidelines could impact cardiovascular practice.

Results presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in August sparked debate ahead of new guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease. Should the U.S. follow the UK in making CT coronary angiography a first-order test for the diagnosis of stable angina?

Headline grabbing results from the five-year SCOT-HEART update showed conducting CT coronary angiography (CTA) in patients with chest pain to be superior to standard care, even reducing rates of heart attack over a five-year period by 41 percent.

With these eye-catching results derived from a well-organized and randomized study, many experts responded with excitement for CTA. “This is one of the most impactful trials, not just in imaging but in cardiovascular medicine,” said Todd C. Villines, MD of the Uniformed Services University School of Medicine during the session. David Newby, MD, PhD, of the University of Edinburgh capped the presentation by asking, “Should CT angiography be viewed as the test of choice in patients with stable chest pain?”

This question could have a massive impact on practice, and U.S. physicians eagerly await new consensus guidelines for patients with stable ischemic heart disease, due out this Fall. Following these impressive results, new guidelines could follow suit with the National Institutes for Health and Care Excellence in the United Kingdom, which recommended in 2016 that CT angiography be a first-order investigation for patients with stable chest pain.

Continue reading Should CT Coronary Angiography be a First-Order Test?

Transradial Access: where we are

A popular hashtag among cardiologists on Twitter, #RadialFirst hopes to promote the adoption of transradial access for cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in cath labs across the world thanks to a deepening evidence base of positive outcomes.

The evidence shows that transradial access is associated with reductions in bleeding, vascular complications, and time to ambulation compared with a femoral approach. However, while the adoption of the transradial approach is increasing in the United States, the approach is not as widely used as it is in Europe, Canada and Asia—perhaps due to the challenges in the approach’s learning curve.

So, what is the current state of the transradial approach in the United States? That is the question a new comprehensive literature review from the Duke Clinical Research Institute, published in Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, set out to answer.

Continue reading Transradial Access: where we are

TAVR Volume Requirements Spark Continued Debate

CMS considers changing TAVR volume requirements

CMS Considers Changing TAVR Volume Requirements

Debate over transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures continues as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) considers changing the status quo. Are TAVR volume requirements limiting rural and minority access to this life-saving procedure, or are they still necessary for patient safety?

In June 2018, cardiology news sources widely reported that CMS opened public comment on established volume requirements for hospitals and heart teams to perform TAVR. The Medicare Evidence Development & Coverage Advisory Committee (MEDCAC) then met on July 25 to discuss the issue. A report in Cardiovascular Business suggested that the committee appeared split on the subject—especially in weighing the potential harms of limiting TAVR to only high volume hospitals.

Cases for and against TAVR volume requirements

The Case for TAVR Volume Requirements

For those on the side of maintaining TAVR volume requirements, the benefits are obvious—volume is associated with positive outcomes and lower rates of complications. In fact, a 2018 expert consensus document from four major cardiology societies actually supported increasing volume requirements to maintain a TAVR program, to ensure adequate data collection for statistically reliable quality metrics and quality assurance.

Continue reading TAVR Volume Requirements Spark Continued Debate