How COVID-19 is affecting work for cardiovascular professionals

ACVP - How COVID-19 is affecting work for cardiovascular professionals.

It's an overwhelming and busy time for every one—especially for our cardiovascular professionals who are doing their best to provide high quality care as hospital resources are diverted to containing the COVID-19 pandemic. At the Alliance of Cardiovascular Professionals, we reached out to some of our fellows and leaders to offer insight into how COVID-19 is affecting work for cardiovascular professionals, how different organizations are handling the crisis, and what the future holds for cardiovascular professionals.

If you'd like to know about ACVP's own response to COVID-19, you can find that here.

We are particularly thankful to new fellow Jeff Richards, MBA, RCIS, FACVP, who made the time to provide us with the following, detailed response to kick off discussion among our entire network about how COVID-19 is affecting work for cardiovascular professionals.

If you have a spare moment, please tell us how COVID-19 is affecting your work!

Leave a comment, below »


As an RCIS in a very busy Cath Lab, my workflow has changed dramatically. Our lab went from doing twenty-five to thirty cases a day to less than five procedures. The Cardiology team has been diligently working to comb through patients and are only bringing to the lab individuals who are deemed urgent or emergent. The cardiac team is relying more heavily on coronary CTA than they may have in the past as it is generally quicker and exposes fewer staff members. That being said, we are still conducting outpatient, endomyocardial biopsies for post cardiac transplant patients as timely medication adjustments in the event of rejection are still crucial.

Our staffing model has changed drastically as well over the past few weeks. We are only bringing in one to two teams and are letting staff go home as quickly as possible throughout the shift. In the past, we have generally worked on three person teams consisting of a combination of nurses and technologists. Our workflow typically has one nurse sedating and one or two technologists driving the table and circulating. However, with our goal of reducing exposure, we have dropped the in-room team down to one nurse and one technologist, with a third team member outside the room to aid in fetching products, imaging consoles, and anything that may be outside of the procedure room.

Continue reading How COVID-19 is affecting work for cardiovascular professionals

The Value of an Association of Cardiovascular Professionals

the value of an association of cardiovscular professionals

My boss, Peggy McElgunn, is a truly excellent mentor and advocate. She has decades of experience serving as the Executive Director of the Alliance of Cardiovascular Professionals as well as with other professional associations and non-profit organizations across healthcare and other industries. Her wealth of knowledge and expertise is no small part of the value ACVP members receive for their dues investment. And in thinking about continuing the spirit of Cardiovascular Professionals Week year-round, I asked her to share with us some of her thoughts on the value of an association of cardiovascular professionals, what supporting an association like ACVP really does both for individuals and for the profession as a whole. - Kurt Jensen


Professional associations have existed for as long as people have gathered and there have been trades, crafts and professions.  It is apparent we have a basic need to form communities with people who share similar interests. There is no doubt that, together, we are able to professionally accomplish more than any one of us can do independently. 

Social Networks Can't Replace an Association of Cardiovascular Professionals

In an era of the internet and social communities, the value of professional associations have been questioned, particularly by younger entrants into a field. But the internet does not curate our professional connections. The internet does not promote professional recognition as a verified expert or qualified voice. The internet does not catalog the wealth of professional information and provide us with specific support to enable us to maximize our time and potential. 

Online social networks, alone, are a poor substitute for an association of cardiovascular professionals. Only an association with a history of commitment and dedication to its members can do this effectively. 

Continue reading The Value of an Association of Cardiovascular Professionals

The Future of Cardiovascular Services, According to Our Fellows

The Future of Cardiovascular Services According to Our Fellows - ACVP Blog

Last week, we celebrated Cardiovascular Professionals Week and announced our inaugural class of Fellows of the Alliance of Cardiovascular Professionals, a community of outstanding individual leaders in cardiovascular service delivery. So everyone can get to know these outstanding and deeply experienced ACVP members a little better, we asked them questions about what the future of cardiovascular services holds for professionals.

The Future is Bright for Cardiovascular Professionals

Most of our fellows see growth in cardiovascular services to be a boon for the profession. "This is a profession that is growing and flourishing," said Andrew Graves, RCIS, FACVP, a Senior Territory Sales Manager with ACIST. "Yes, there are challenges associated with that growth. But the future is bright, in that there is high demand for professionals with cardiovascular skills—specific skills that take years to develop and optimize."

"Professionals in cardiovascular service [will see] longevity and growth," said Alphonso Beard, Jr., CCT, RCIS, FACVP, currently an independent consultant for cardiovascular travel staffing agencies. "According to projections published in the November 2013 issue of Health Affairs, the demand for cardiovascular services will grow about 20 percent by 2025."

"I think the future is very bright for our field, with new procedures being done all the time," said John Jennings, CRT, RRT, NPS, ACCS, RCIS, FACVP, an Implementation Team Lead with Cardiosolution. "It is a wonderful field for new people looking to going into healthcare."

Continue reading The Future of Cardiovascular Services, According to Our Fellows

Benefits of Mentorships in Cardiovascular Services

Mentorship Matters

Collaborative partnership and mentorship are practices woven through the development of modern medicine from antiquity to the present day. Diverse “lineages” dapple medical history, as scientists, innovators, and scholars have passed on their knowledge, discoveries, and the driving curiosity in which their pursuit of medical progress is grounded. Mentorships in cardiovascular services, for example, have launched innovations, developed personal excellence, and spread quality best practices.

In today’s environment, which is characterized by increasing specialization and a wide array of assisting clinicians and other professionals, the role of mentorships has never been more important or had more potential to shape the way healthcare is taught and delivered. But the amount of time and effort involved in developing and maintaining mentorships can be significant, and with the continued advancement and development of professional curricula, some may see the “above and beyond” nature of mentorships as burdensome.

Drawing on a few recent studies examining mentorship, testimonials from professionals who have participated in mentorship programs, and our own experience in the world of mentor-mentee relationships, this blog series seeks to answer some important questions about mentorships in cardiovascular services. Firstly, why are mentorships in cardiovascular services valuable? What are the benefits of mentorship to mentors and mentees?

Continue reading Benefits of Mentorships in Cardiovascular Services