RN, Rad & Cardiovascular Technologist Education in 2019

Cardiac-specific RN, Rad & Cardiovascular Technologist Education in 2019

ACVP announces slate of early 2019 regional conferences

Cardiovascular professionals, especially RNs and Radiologic Technologists, often struggle to find good cardiac-specific continuing education. At ACVP, we make it our mission to bring the best cardiac-specific continuing education to you. We’re excited to announce our slate of regional meetings planned for early 2019, which will provide high quality, inter-professional RN, RT and Cardiovascular Technologist education at a low cost for attendees.

ACVP regional meetings provide a unique opportunity for registered nurses, radiologic and cardiovascular technologists to earn CEUs for cardiac-specific education in a preferred, in-person format. Excellent speakers offer timely content relevant to practice in your area, and attendee reviews are consistently stellar.

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ACVP Launches Mentor Matching Service for Members

All members should participate in new mentor matching service!

The Alliance of Cardiovascular Professionals is excited to announce a new service ahead of 2019—a new mentor matching program for members. Mentor matching will provide ACVP members a unique opportunity to enrich their personal and professional lives, get to know their fellow ACVP members, and get the most out of the ACVP community.

Members, get started with our mentor match program, now.

Mentor a fellow cardiovascular technologist, registered nurse or radiologic technologist in cardiovascular care. Build your personal and professional network, or advance your expertise or career with guidance and insight from like-minded professionals.

All members should participate—as a mentor, mentee, or both!

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Should CT Coronary Angiography be a First-Order Test?

New guidelines could impact cardiovascular practice.

Results presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in August sparked debate ahead of new guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease. Should the U.S. follow the UK in making CT coronary angiography a first-order test for the diagnosis of stable angina?

Headline grabbing results from the five-year SCOT-HEART update showed conducting CT coronary angiography (CTA) in patients with chest pain to be superior to standard care, even reducing rates of heart attack over a five-year period by 41 percent.

With these eye-catching results derived from a well-organized and randomized study, many experts responded with excitement for CTA. “This is one of the most impactful trials, not just in imaging but in cardiovascular medicine,” said Todd C. Villines, MD of the Uniformed Services University School of Medicine during the session. David Newby, MD, PhD, of the University of Edinburgh capped the presentation by asking, “Should CT angiography be viewed as the test of choice in patients with stable chest pain?”

This question could have a massive impact on practice, and U.S. physicians eagerly await new consensus guidelines for patients with stable ischemic heart disease, due out this Fall. Following these impressive results, new guidelines could follow suit with the National Institutes for Health and Care Excellence in the United Kingdom, which recommended in 2016 that CT angiography be a first-order investigation for patients with stable chest pain.

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Transradial Access: where we are

A popular hashtag among cardiologists on Twitter, #RadialFirst hopes to promote the adoption of transradial access for cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in cath labs across the world thanks to a deepening evidence base of positive outcomes.

The evidence shows that transradial access is associated with reductions in bleeding, vascular complications, and time to ambulation compared with a femoral approach. However, while the adoption of the transradial approach is increasing in the United States, the approach is not as widely used as it is in Europe, Canada and Asia—perhaps due to the challenges in the approach’s learning curve.

So, what is the current state of the transradial approach in the United States? That is the question a new comprehensive literature review from the Duke Clinical Research Institute, published in Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, set out to answer.

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